Sarah Albee, illustrated by Robert leighton. Poop Happened: A History of the World from the Bottom Up.
(Walker  Company, 2010)
If this book teaches you anything, it’s that if you try to ignore this… stuff… it doesn’t go away, it just
keeps piling up!

Susan Campbell Bartoletti. They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist
Group
. (Houghton Mifflin, 2010)
We sometimes wish we could brush some of our history under a rug and try to forget it. We know we
shouldn't, but sometimes our history hurts too much. The Ku Klux Klan is one of our darkest, most
terrifying memories. Men draped in sheets riding through the night to terrorize the innocent is the stuff
of horror films and nightmares. Do yourself a favor and shine a light on those memories with Susan
Campbell Bartoletti's
They Called Themselves the K.K.K.

Benson Bobrick. A Passion for Victory: The Story of the Olympics in Ancient and Early Modern Times.
(Knopf, 2012)
A thankfully non-idealized look at the Olympics as sports, history, and culture. That means it will have
some appeal to those interested in any of those aspects, but might be dissappointing to a hard-core
sports or history buff. But with it being an Olympic year, this should be a real draw, especially compared
to the standard sickeningly sweet Olympics books for kids.

Suzy Beamer Bohnert. Learning Basketball’s Lingo. (B&B Publishing)
From the “Game Day Goddess” comes a book on the language of basketball for the complete novice.
What makes this book special? It covers not just the official terms, but slang as well. Where else are
you going to find a definition of a “ticky-tack foul”? A bit simplistic for the sports buff, but for anybody
who wants to sit down next to dad and watch a game, this is the dictionary for you.

Ed Butts, art by Scott Plumbe. Bodyguards!: From Gladiators to the Secret Service. (Annick Press, 2012)
Presidents have them. Kings too. Businessmen, gangsters, celebrities, even kids have body guards.
Samurai, Secret Service, guard dogs, even guard geese. These are the stories of the guards that saved,
the ones that failed, and the ones who turned on those they were sworn to protect.

Timothy Decker. For Liberty: The Story of the Boston Massacre. (Calkins Creek, 2009)
For those elementary and middle school kids who remember their picture book days as the last time
they loved reading, here is a powerful take on a grimly fascinating event. This is "small" history; fifteen
minutes that changed the world, and the drama is enhanced by stark, black and white illustrations that
evoke both David MacAulay and the Manga form. Perhaps its greatest gift is to individualize the players,
making the tragedy all the more human. This is history that comes alive.

Claire Eamer, artwork by Sa Boothroyn. The World in Your Lunchbox: The Wacky History and Wierd
Science of Everyday Foods.
(Annick Press, 2012)
Hey whatcha eating? Floor sweepings and germ burps. No, really? It looks like a hot dog on a bun. Why
don't they serve chocolate in prison? Because it makes you break out. And who the heck first thought of
scooping up curdled milk and eating it? Everyone, and I mean everyone, eats the stuff in this book, so
you might as well know where it somes from, how it works, and a few jokes to tell your friends when you
eat it.

"Extreme Cuisine" (Series):
Meish Goldish.
Baby Bug Dishes. (Bearport, 2009)
Meish Goldish.
Bug-a-licious. (Bearport, 2009)
From cricket lollipops to roasted ants in the movie theatre, here are the stories of bug foods from
around the world. Part cook book, part social study, and all queasy, this is a fun nonfiction written at a
very accessible level.
Meish Goldish. Mammal Menu. (Bearport, 2009)
Dinah Williams.
Shocking Seafood. (Bearport, 2009)
Dinah Williams.
Slithery, Slimy, Scaly Treats. (Bearport, 2009)
Meish Goldish.
Spider-tizers and Other Creepy Treats. (Bearport, 2009)

Ralph Fletcher,
Guy-Write: What Every Guy Reader Needs to Know. (Henry Holt, 2012)
Simple message: you don't have to be a professional writer, or an adult, or a girl, to write. This is not a
book about boys and writing but a book written to boys about their writing, their way. Ralph Fletcher
writes great books for kids, but reading this you might almost think he was a boy once himself.

Inside Special Forces (Series):
Peter Ryan.
Black Ops and Other Special Missions of the U.S. Air Force Combat Control Team. [Inside
Special Forces] (Rosen Central, 2013)  
When is a commando more than a commando? When he can call down the entire firepower of the U.S.
Air Force on those who stand before him. Air Force Combat Controllers are part Navy SEALs, part
paratroopers, part Green Berets, and air traffic controllers to boot. They give special forces teams from
all branches of the military the ability to see the battlefield, call in air strikes from fighters, bombers,
missiles, and drones, and guide evacuation helicopters into fierce hotspots. They are "multipliers" of
combat effectiveness. This is their story, in bold, technical language for the most military-minded of
readers.
Theresa Shea. Black Ops and Other Special Missions of the U.S. Army Green Berets. (Rosen Central,
2013)
Jamie Poolos.
Black Ops and Other Special Missions of the U.S. Marine Corps Special Operations
Command
. (Rosen Central, 2013)  
Simone Payment.
Black Ops and Other Special Missions of the U.S. Navy SEALs. (Rosen Central, 2013)

Kelly Milner Halls and William Graham Sumper.
Saving the Baghdad Zoo: A True Story  of Hope and
Heroes
. (Greenwillow Books, 2009)
War destroys lives, and not just human lives. A handful of brave people, led by an American Army officer,
took on the challenge of saving the animals in zoos all over Baghdad during the Iraq War. With bullets
flying around them, they wrangled lions, alligators and many more animals. Heroes come in some
surprising shapes.

Sandra Markle. Outside and Inside Mummies. (Walker & Company, 2005)  

Joy Masoff.
Oh Yikes!: History's Grossest, Wackiest Moments. (Workman, 2000)    

Jennifer Morse.
Guiness Book of World Records 2009. (Scholastic Reference, 2008)

Jim Murphy.
The Giant and How He Humbugged America. (Scholastic, 2012)
Oh those silly, gullible people of the 1800's. In the age of Facebook, it is worth noting that the technology
may have changed, but we are still fooled in much the same way, so long as some people are willing to
decieve, and a whole lot of people are willing to believe. One observer noted a, "peculiarly American
superstition that the correctness of a belief is decided by the number of people who can be induced to
adopt it." Read any good posts lately?

Kadir Nelson. We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball. (Jump at the Sun, 2008)

Nathaniel Philbrick.
Revenge of the Whale: The True Story of the Whaleship  Essex. (Putnam, 2002)

Joshua Piven and David Borgenicht.
The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook. (Chronicle Books,
1999)

Joshua Piven, and David Borgenicht.
The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Extreme Edition.
(Chronicle Books, 2005)

Ripley’s Believe It Or Not Special Edition 2009. (Scholastic, 2008)

Michael J. Rosen, with Ben Kassoy.
No Dribbling the Squid: Octopush, Shin Kicking, Elephant Polo, and
Other Oddball Sports
. (Andrew McMeel, 2009)
Competitive spitting, shovel racing, backward bicycling, basketball on unicycles, and Octopush
(underwater hockey); there are some really strange sports out there, and they are all in this one little
book, with plenty of pictures of all the zanyness. Two or three pages on each sport, complete with
statistics, rules, and probably too many bad puns makes this a quick, fun read. No need to read it cover
to cover; flip it open to any page and enjoy. (Hint: Kudu Dung spitting on p. 72)

"Scary Places" (Series)
Dinah Williams.
Abandoned Insane Asylums. (Bearport, 2008)
Sarah Parvis.
Creepy Castles. (Bearport, 2008)
Michael E. Goodman.
Dark Labyrinths. (Bearport, 2008)
Sarah Parvis.
Ghost Towns. (Bearport, 2008)
Sarah Parvis.
Haunted Hotels. (Bearport, 2008)
Dinah Williams.
Haunted Houses. (Bearport, 2008)
Dinah Williams.
Spooky Cemeteries. (Bearport, 2008)
Steven L. Stern.
Wretched Ruins. (Bearport, 2010)

James Solheim.
It's Disgusting and We Ate It!: True Food Facts from Around the World and Throughout
History
. (Simon & Schuster, 1998)

Stephen Spignesi.
The Weird 100: A Collection of the Strange and the Unexplained. (Citadel Press, 2004)

Sports Illustrated Kids Big Book of Why. (Sports Illustrated Kids Books, 2012)
So why do baseball managers wear uniforms when coaches in other sports don't? That's a great
question! And there are many more, like why are there 10 teams in the Big 12 Conference and 12 teams
in the Big Ten? Why are three goals a "hat trick"? Why is the San Francisco Giants' mascot a
seal? And why are they the New York Giants and Jets if they play in New Jersey? And if you wonder why
coaches in other sports DON'T wear uniforms, just picture Bill Parcells in Spandex.

Sally M. Walker. Blizzard of Glass: The Halifax Explosion of 1917. (Henry Holt, 2011)
What is the connection between the city of Halifax in Canada, World War I, and the Christmas tree in
Boston, Massachusetts? Two thousand deaths in the largest man-made explosion before the atomic
bomb, that's what.

Janet Wilson. Our Rights: How Kids are Changing the World. (Second Story Press, 2013)
Books about inspiring kids often share one fatal flaw. The children involved may be inspirational, but
they lack agency. They survive, but action is performed by adults. Wilson's book has no such flaw. The
children she profiles don't just cry for help, they help. They start banks for other street kids, they put
their muscle into getting water to other kids. They put their lives on the lines to protect other kids lives.
This nonfiction book about kids, largely told by kids, has real plot. This is a book for kids who don't read
for pleasure, they read if it helps them do something. The book also contains one of the funniest
misprints ever: In a section on undocumented children, the book claims that, "Each year 51 billion births
are not registered." Wow, in one year the population of the earth would increase 1,000%, and we
wouldn't even know it!

Books For Boys
Suggestions by Michael Sullivan
Middle Reader Boys Nonfiction: History and Social Science
See also:
Middle Reader Boys Nonfiction: Science, Nature, and Technology
Middle Reader Boys Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir
The Web Home of Michael Sullivan
teacher, librarian, chess instructor, author, storyteller, expert on boys and reading.
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Mary Losure.
Wild Boy: The Real Life of the Savage of Aveyron. (Candlewick Press, 2013)
We use the word “wild” all the time when we talk about kids. But what does wild really mean? What of
a child who never knew parents, houses, even words? Who lived in the woods and ate what he could
dig with his own hands? Would you say he was a savage, or was he free? Two hundred years ago,
such a boy was caught and dragged naked into a French town. What could be done with him? What
should be done with him? Was he being saved or imprisoned?


Peter Ryan.
Black Ops and Other Special Missions of the U.S. Air Force Combat Control Team. [Inside
Special Forces] (Rosen Central, 2013)  
When is a commando more than a commando? When he can call down the entire firepower of the U.S.
Air Force on those who stand before him. Air Force Combat Controllers are part Navy SEALs, part
paratroopers, part Green Berets, and air traffic controllers to boot. They give special forces teams
from all branches of the military the ability to see the battlefield, call in air strikes from fighters,
bombers, missiles, and drones, and guide evacuation helicopters into fierce hotspots. They are
"multipliers" of combat effectiveness. This is their story, in bold, technical language for the most
military-minded of readers.

Davide Cali, illustrations by Gabriella Giandelli. Monsters & Legends. (Flying Eye Books, 2013)
Like nonfiction, but fantasy too? Love stories of monsters and strange creatures, but you are aren't
buying it for a second? Love to see the world for what it is, but still wish there was a little magic left in
it? Then I have a book for you. Here are all the things that go bump in the night, all the supernatural
beasties that people have believed in - and feared - for ages, as well as the most likely explanations for
why people believed in them.